Blog

We Are What We Search: Google Wants to Know Your Search Story

By Kimberly Reyes (@CommDuCoeur)

There’s a book on my coffee table known as “The Lemur Book,” and while I’d like to think that I came up with this clever epithet myself, there are in actuality thousands of people who refer to it as such.

My boyfriend read The Lemur Book over the summer, which is veritably titled

post-image

By Kimberly Reyes (@CommDuCoeur)

There’s a book on my coffee table known as “The Lemur Book,” and while I’d like to think that I came up with this clever epithet myself, there are in actuality thousands of people who refer to it as such.

My boyfriend read The Lemur Book over the summer, which is veritably titled Ambient Findability and written by Peter Morville, information architect extraordinaire and professor at University of Michigan’s School of Information.

Morville addresses the art of search in a world dominated by the unlimited availability of information. In the final chapter of his book, Morville points to Internet search as a vehicle for independent learning.  He re-establishes his thesis: what we find influences what we do, and adds what we search for shapes who we are.

And while Morville’s prediction for search in the age of information overload is less than flattering, if not slightly apocalyptic, it sure made me think about the power of search.  What do our searches reveal about our culture?  Our practices?  Ourselves?

To answer that, we must ask the experts, and no one is a better expert on search than Google.

Take, for instance, Google’s “Parisian Love” commercial (above), which debuted during February’s Superbowl.  Google presented a robust protagonist, the object of his desire, a touching love story, and a happy ending – without us ever seeing an actual person, place, or thing.

This, to me, is marketing genius.  Google created a product that has become so entrenched in our daily lives that it acts as a photo book of where we’ve gone and what we’ve done.

I immediately went to my web browser and drew up my search history:

National Train Day
superheroes (this is a common one)
West Elm bookcase
white fitted blazer xs
Blankets by Craig Thompson
homemade cat food recipes
handlebar bike basket
Zooey Deschanel (also a common one)
132 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11238
unclog hair shower drain
Jersey state parks

I’ll admit that some of these are not exactly flattering.  But I’ll also admit that each of these items truly represents a slice of my day-to-day life, a part of who I am.

What does your search story look like?  Google has developed a neat tool for you to create your own “search story” video, upload it to YouTube, and share it with your social network – or even send it our way 😉

Go to http://www.youtube.com/searchstories to create your own search story.

Get in touch with us

let’s start building better today

Contact Us