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The REAL Reason We Bleed Zemoga Green: Corporate Identity and Color

Rothko Room The REAL Reason We Bleed Zemoga Green: Corporate Identity and Color

By Kimberly Reyes (@CommDuCoeur)

Abstract artist Mark Rothko believed in the power of color.  After drawing parallels between the work of his contemporaries and the drawings often produced by children, Rothko noted that all art begins with the same basic element of color.  His most well-known paintings have been nothing more than fields of color, squares and rectangles in various hues juxtaposed to represent an emotion or elicit a visceral response.  While all of Europe was engaged in war, Rothko used color as a language that transcended borders, and the scale of his canvases would occupy the viewer’s world, creating a deeply moving experience that one would hardly expect from such simplified forms.

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By Kimberly Reyes (@CommDuCoeur)

Abstract artist Mark Rothko believed in the power of color.  After drawing parallels between the work of his contemporaries and the drawings often produced by children, Rothko noted that all art begins with the same basic element of color.  His most well-known paintings have been nothing more than fields of color, squares and rectangles in various hues juxtaposed to represent an emotion or elicit a visceral response.  While all of Europe was engaged in war, Rothko used color as a language that transcended borders, and the scale of his canvases would occupy the viewer’s world, creating a deeply moving experience that one would hardly expect from such simplified forms.

Rothko’s late works demonstrated that color is just as important, if not more important, than things like perspective, accuracy, or subject matter, and his lessons hold true beyond the art world.  To illustrate, here’s a pop quiz.  Below are three well-known corporate logos in black & white.  Can you guess what brands they represent?

How well do you think you did?  Now try it with the official brand colors:

Shame on you if you haven’t figured out all three this time around (the first logo is Pepsi, the second is Kodak, and the third is BMW)!  The point of this exercise is to get you thinking about the importance of color to your business.  A significant amount of research is available on the effects of color on one’s mind and body.  For instance, Science Daily ran an article explaining how blue light was used to cure the MRSA Staph Infection, and the American Psychological Association published a study showing that color helps us remember things better.  Color can influence everything from how we behave to how we learn, and adds context and meaning to other kinds of stimulus.

So what does this mean to us?

Some companies, like McDonald’s and UPS, can be identified exclusively by their corporate colors.  And believe it or not, colors may play a huge role in your business strategy.  Color can communicate a million different messages about your brand in a single glance, before the consumer even has a chance to process the name of your company!  To really understand the importance of color to your marketing strategy, here’s a list of little-known facts from Color Matters:

1. A study by The Institute for Color Research reveals people make a subconscious judgment about a person, environment, or product within 90 seconds of initial viewing, and that between 62% and 90% of that assessment is based on color alone.
2. A study by University of Loyola, Maryland shows that color increases brand recognition by up to 80 percent.
3. A book called Color for Impact by Jan V. White cites a study on phone directory ads showing that ads run in color are read up to 42% more often than the same ads in black and white.
4. Tests indicate that a black and white image may sustain interest for less than two-thirds a second, whereas a colored image may hold the attention for two seconds or more.
5. A study conducted by The Xerox Corporation and International Communications Research shows that 90% business owners feel that color can assist in attracting new customers, while 81% think color gives them a competitive edge.

Color is something we take very seriously here at Zemoga, as we design the platforms, engines, and interfaces on which you interact with your consumers.  Some of our clients ask us to create environments where the user feels comforted, while others ask us to design environments that make the user feel important.  Some want the user to think their brand is cool, while others want the user to think their brand is calm and professional.  In fact, a lot of the features and attributes that our clients identify as important to their brand have specific color associations that can influence how the user feels and even what they do when interacting with your brand.

As you can probably tell, green is the Z Team’s favorite color, and depending on who you ask, green means a number of different things to us.  Green symbolizes growth and life, and this past year has been a tremendous time of growth for Zemoga – as a matter of fact, I joined the team just this year!

A lot of people associate green with freshness, and movement (as in, “green means go”).  As a digital innovation firm, we deliver cutting-edge solutions that use the latest technology to keep your company moving forward.

Green suggests stability and endurance.  Green is a “cool color” – and that statement alone has its own myriad of interpretations. It signifies new beginnings, energy, and vibrancy.  It is associated with youth, spring, balance, and harmony.  In color therapy, green has a calming effect – for this reason, many TV talk shows keep guests in a green room before they go live.

For more good green fun, check out the following links:

Tasty green treats on ColourLovers
Gorgeous green fashion finds on Polyvore
A handmade St. Patrick’s Day on the Etsy Blog

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