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Google Plus Your World versus… Everyone

By now, you’ve all seen the Google blog post announcing Search, plus Your World. We thought we’d touch on a few points about social in your search before the technical speak comes your way.

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By now, you’ve all seen the Google blog post announcing Search, plus Your World. And while we’ll have a more thorough exploration of the ramifications of it from our resident metrics/analytics and SEO guy Russ Ward coming your way, we thought we’d touch on a few points about social in your search before the technical speak comes your way.

Searching the social web is not new. In May of 2011, Bing announced a deepening in its partnership with Facebook:

Today, Bing is bringing the collective IQ of the Web together with the opinions of the people you trust most, to bring the “Friend Effect” to search. Starting today, you can receive personalized search results based on the opinions of your friends by simply signing into Facebook. New features make it easier to see what your Facebook friends “like” across the Web, incorporate the collective know-how of the Web into your search results, and begin adding a more conversational aspect to your searches. Decisions can now be made with more than facts, now the opinions of your trusted friends and the collective wisdom of the Web.

With its new Search+, Google is doing the same thing. Or is it?

With Google as ubiquitous as Kleenex, we’re seeing a lot of strong opinions across the web. Will this search algorithm air all our dirty little secrets? Is it more secure than that? Is it doing a disservice to all the other players out there? Is this an anti-trust issue?

We can’t really know yet. These things take (a little bit of) time to play out.

Something that is interesting, though, and you can read more over on The Next Web, is that Twitter is not so excited in these changes because, guess what? They’re not in ‘em.

From the official statement:

For years, people have relied on Google to deliver the most relevant results anytime they wanted to find something on the Internet.

Often, they want to know more about world events and breaking news. Twitter has emerged as a vital source of this real-time information, with more than 100 million users sending 250 million Tweets every day on virtually every topic. As we’ve seen time and time again, news breaks first on Twitter; as a result, Twitter accounts and Tweets are often the most relevant results.

We’re concerned that as a result of Google’s changes, finding this information will be much harder for everyone. We think that’s bad for people, publishers, news organizations and Twitter users.

Of course, Google says it’s all Twitter and Facebook’s own fault, having broken off related partnerships with the company. You can read all about that on Mashable.

Stay tuned for Russ’ tech-speak on it. Coming soon …

(image credit: CBS News)

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