Blog

Adobe Max and the Open Web

By Andres Garcia (@oagarciar) Months ago at the Google IO conference, Google’s Vice President of Engineering, Vic Gundotra gave us a taste of this year’s Adobe Max event with one phrase: “part of being open means that you are inclusive, rather than exclusive” – a clear message to Apple. He concluded his presentation with: “It Read more

post-image

By Andres Garcia (@oagarciar)

Months ago at the Google IO conference, Google’s Vice President of Engineering, Vic Gundotra gave us a taste of this year’s Adobe Max event with one phrase: “part of being open means that you are inclusive, rather than exclusive” – a clear message to Apple. He concluded his presentation with: “It turns out that on the Internet, people use Flash.”

I had a lot of expectations about the event, mostly because of all the noise caused by the battle of Apple vs. Flash. Fortunately, I was satisfied with the event and I’m happy  that Adobe is aligned with my personal thoughts: we have a lot of technologies, and each one belongs in different projects with different needs. A good web developer is not the one that builds the most “fancy and animated menu” in Flash, but the one that can select the most appropriated ingredients to build the best user experience that achieves the client goals. That’s what Adobe has shown through their conference: the Flash platform is part of a web ecosystem where the content needs to be HTML5 as well.

The use of Flash is still necessary where HTML or JavaScript doesn’t perform well, so there is a lot of space: 3D Games with expensive graphics and performance needs, multi-player experiences, advanced image processing, complex animations, video with content protection, etc. So I hope to not see any misused Flash content anymore (it’s worth noting that this isn’t Flash’s fault…it’s more a problem of bad developers and designers).

The phrase “Multi Screen” was mentioned many times during the conference. It’s no secret that the best scenario for developers and designers is to rely on technologies and tools that can provide solutions to be published for different devices, such as tablets, desktop, cell phones, TV sets, etc. What Adobe has shown is that they are working really hard to provide such solutions: HTML5 and CSS3 tools added to upcoming versions of Flash and Dreamweaver, Flash Platform integrated in almost all mobile devices, Jquery support in Adobe Tools, Flash player totally integrated in Google Chrome not as a plugin but part of the browser, Flash as the main tool to generate interactive content in Google TV, and Flash support in the cool Blackberry PlayBook Tablet that is said to compete with the iPad when it launches.

But, who is supporting Adobe in this arduous task, called the Open Screen Project? Let’s see…Google, RIM, Sony, Nokia, Palm, Samsung, Motorola, LG, Intel, just to mention a few. So the question now is: when’s Apple going to join in? After all, there is enough room in this ecosystem and it’s all the good guys that are talking about an open web.

Information about the Open Screen project can be found at: http://www.openscreenproject.org

Check out some of my pictures from the event below!

The support of Adobe AIR 2.5 and Flash Player 10.1 in Google TV devices allows developers and designers to create interactive experiences for what Adobe and Google call, “the next era in web content.”

Adobe featured an advanced and hardware accelerated 3D engine. This demo shows that Adobe is going to compete with the Unity3D guys.

New tools in Adobe InDesign CS5 allow desktop publishers to generate digital magazines with interactive content, audio, video, 360º models, slideshows, social media and web content. The digital magazines can be published on iPads and Blackberry Playbooks once it launches in the 1st Q of 2011.

From LA with love!

More pics from the event can be found in my Facebook album.

Get in touch with us

let’s start building better today

Contact Us